Even if  President Trump doesn't serve the full term to which he was elected last fall, as I expect will be the case, he's already achieved a distinction that won't soon be matched by any of his successors: He's become arguably the greatest prevaricator in the history of American politics. Don't just take my word […]

 

Even if  President Trump doesn't serve the full term to which he was elected last fall, as I expect will be the case, he's already achieved a distinction that won't soon be matched by any of his successors:

He's become arguably the greatest prevaricator in the history of American politics.

Don't just take my word for it.

The Washington Post reported this week that Trump has made  many hundreds  of false and misleading statements in just seven months on the job. And the paper listed all 1,057 of them.

“That's an impressive number by any standard,” the Post said. “In fact, we are a little late with this update because we have simply been overwhelmed keeping track of the deluge of claims made by the president in the later part of July. Things slowed down during the president's ‘working vacation,' so we have finally been able to catch up.”

It's only fair, I suppose, to note that the number of Trump's lies has been inflated whenever he repeats one of them.

Here's an example cited by the Post:

“Trump's most repeated claim, uttered 50 times, was some variation of the statement that the Affordable Care Act is dying and ‘essentially dead.' The Congressional Budget Office has said that the Obamacare exchanges, despite well-documented issues, are not imploding and are expected to remain stable for the foreseeable future.”

In the early days of Trump's presidency, he was peddling about 4.6 falsehoods per day, the paper said. But the pace has accelerated in recent months.

The real scandal here, of course, is not that Trump has been so frequently dishonest. Most politicians are fibbers to some extent. What's worse is that millions of Americans seem to have believed even the most egregious of The Donald's whoppers.

That widespread gullibility is at least party attributable, I suppose, to Trump's claim that media reports that reflect poorly on his  performance are just “fake news.”