An article I read this morning — I forget exactly where — told of a new warning from scientists that the underground supervolcano in Yellowstone National Park might violently erupt much sooner than previously estimated and could wipe out the human race. Funny, but the thing in this article that most stirred my thoughts […]

 

An article I read this morning — I forget exactly where — told of a new warning from scientists that the underground supervolcano in Yellowstone National Park might violently erupt much sooner than previously estimated and could wipe out the human race.

Funny, but the thing in this article that most stirred my thoughts was not the  potential imminence of my own demise. Rather, it was the issue of  everyone else dying when I do.

Hmmm.

There's a certain appeal, I have to admit, to the potential guarantee that I won't miss a thing if the whole show ends when I end.

No, I don't wish death upon all my friends and loved ones. But, of course, death is inevitably in store for every last one of them — sooner or later. And if I could take them all with me into the Great Beyond when I depart, well…there's a certain appeal to the idea.

But the article about the supervolcano in Yellowstone does not say that the disappearance of human beings  will happen quickly.   The implication is that the process will be less than instantaneous — depending, I suppose, on one's proximity to the park.

And then there's the matter of my loved ones getting cheated out of full lives. But we're talking about the eruption of a massive volcano here. I don't want it to happen at all, but if it does, I don't  want my family and friends to endure the terrible hardships that would follow a huge eruption.

In the final analysis, of course, none of us is going to get all worked up about this new warning about the big volcano in Yellowstone. We can just file it away with all the other mostly dormant fears of bad stuff — environmental or otherwise.

We can all pretty much abandon the thought  that our current friends and relatives will pass away when we do. The best we can hope for is that a few of them will occasionally recall something about the impact we had on their lives.