You regular readers of this blog — or at least the more intelligent among you — may have noticed that I showed uncommon prescience in two of my posts last week. The first of these came on Monday when I called for Robert Mueller, the special counsel in the federal investigation of Russian meddling […]

You regular readers of this blog — or at least the more intelligent among you — may have noticed that I showed uncommon prescience in two of my posts last week.

The first of these came on Monday when I called for Robert Mueller, the special counsel in the federal investigation of Russian meddling in last year's American elections, to speed-up the process a bit if only to give hope to the majority of Americans who disapprove of Donald Trump as president.

The second came on Friday when I publicly shared my sense — just a vague hunch, actually — that Mueller's team was on the very threshold of bringing charges against a person or two or three. Three or four hours later, it was announced that the first indictments in the case would be made public Monday (today). And they were.

So, now that I'm on a streak, I might as well go for broke: Trump's presidency is doomed.

Of course, this isn't so much a daring prediction as a profound grasp of the obvious. I have never thought that an intellectual cipher like The Donald could last the full four years of the term to which he was elected last year. But I've never been sure exactly when the end would come. My guess now is that he'll be gone by January 1, 2019 — perhaps sooner.

I won't list here all the reasons why Trump is ill-suited to the presidency. There are too many of them, and most of us already are familiar with the worst of the bunch. Suffice it to say that the case for showing Trump to the door could be made with just the stuff he said and did before he took office. In the last nine months, the situation has only worsened.

If it turns out that I'm right about Trump serving less than a full term, the political fallout likely will last for years. The Republican Party will have to figure out how — or even if — it's going to reinvent itself. In the past eight years, the GOP establishment has played patty-cake with the so-called Tea Party movement, and now finds itself screwed-up by the nutcase Trumpites in Congress.

Oh sure, the Democratic Party has its own problems, but they are mitigated in part by what the Republicans are experiencing at the hands of Donald Trump.