“Mapping Myth” is the name of the exhibit by Belinda D’Arcy Hanson and Chris Clother in the large gallery. Susan Schimke is showing her drawings called, “Small Gatherings.”

On the second Saturday of each month, Siskiyou Arts Museum holds an art opening and reception featuring different artists. This month, three artists, Belinda Hanson, Chris Clother and Susan Schimke were featured.

“Mapping Myth” is the name of the exhibit by Belinda D’Arcy Hanson and Chris Clother in the large gallery. Susan Schimke is showing her drawings called, “Small Gatherings.”

A long time Dunsmuir resident, Hanson layers three myths – a contemporary science hypothesis, an ancient Native American story, and a fictional animal – bringing them together in present time. A large red triangle fills the room with a chair protruding towards the top with a copper windshield wiper attached to the seat. Grizzly bear foot prints can be followed across the room under the great sculpture, which Hanson calls “Searching for Bosons/Mountain Myth.”

Hanson’s invention of a bear hide attached to a blown-out truck tire, joined together by copper which is conductive, tells of the Delta Fire where dead animals lay along the highway along with burnt trucks. She uses this combination that was found along the highway at the time of the fire to envision a healing between nature and culture called “Beast.”

Her third piece; a chair, a hide, and a headset called, “Unless Today Was Yesterday,” tells a tale of the Skygod and the Grizzly at the bottom of the “mountain” triangle.

Chris Clother’s exhibit explores the function of mythology and how it might be used for self-examination. Using photos and drawings, he has created a narrative experience from his own reflections of Dunsmuir his wife’s home town where they recently relocated back to.

One of his works, he uses a wildlife trail-cam, to creates cryptic stories of real and also unknowable realities to translate into relatable and more understandable forms.

Clother’s photographic tale of conveyance of decipherable information of both corporate and graffiti words on a series of passing train cars called, “Passing Freight train,” finding meaning from both cultural and personal sources.

He also has cartoon drawings and watercolor and graphite images detailing the reflecting Native American and European settler mythologies about the region around Dunsmuir.

Clother also has a mixed media collection called “Nine Soft-Bound Books” of work from his three children, Finley, age 11, Simon, age 8, and Mirabelle, age 6.

“Small Gatherings,” an exhibit by Susan M. Schimke, is freehand graphite drawings which rely on the visual art as a means of communication. An art teacher at Shasta College, she assembled this series of phenomenological drawings of her personal experiences during a sabbatical in the fall of 2018.